According to some experts David Thompson’s early 19th century exploration and mapping achievements surpass Lewis and Clark. He spent a lot of time in what would become Idaho and Washington. North Idaho College give’s you a chance to travel back in time tomorrow:

NIC to offer presentation on David Thompson’s natural world

Who: Wildlife education specialist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kris Buchler
What: will present on the natural habitats that explorer and fur trader David Thompson encountered in the early 19th century during “David Thompson’s Natural World”
When: at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 24
Where: at the Lake City Senior Center at 1916 N. Lakewood Drive in Coeur d’Alene.
How: The presentation is free and open to the public. Information: (208) 772-3953.

Wildlife education specialist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kris Buchler will present on the natural habitats that explorer and fur trader David Thompson encountered in the early 19th century during “David Thompson’s Natural World.” The presentation will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 24 at the Lake City Senior Center, located at 1916 N. Lakewood Drive in Coeur d’Alene.

Thompson was known primarily as a fur trader, explorer and geographer. From 1809-1811, Thompson explored, mapped and recorded what he encountered while building trading posts in the Columbia River region, which included northern Idaho, eastern Washington and western Montana. Thompson also observed numerous animals and plants and recorded many of the species he encountered.

In her presentation, Buchler will use Thompson’s names for various species and identify the more familiar names used today. With pelts, feathers and a live animal, Buchler will recreate the environment Thompson explored centuries ago.

Buchler has spent 12 years with the Idaho Department of Fish and game focused on wildlife education and curriculum development and 14 years on the Coeur d’Alene Audubon Society education committee. She is part of the WREN Foundation in which she creates wildlife programs and presents them throughout the community and is also a licensed raptor rehabilitator with Birds of Prey Northwest.
The presentation is part of a History, Etc., series. The final presentation this spring will be on the Bunker Hill Mine and other mining history of the Silver Valley April 7.

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by NIC’s Molstead Library and the Museum of North Idaho.
Information: (208) 772-3953.